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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
leadership to all of our elected officials to marry lee and, of course, to marry willingly i didn't brown. let me just thank you ail for helping you tell to getting get to this day. i want to thank the contractors and architects and manufactur manufacturesers. thank you for your long hours and hard work in the face of big challenges and those have been some major challenges that are paying off today. so give everyone who had a hand in this a big thank you. we must always honor the memory of folks who lost their lives in the earthquake. the contribution of this bridge first it's a beautiful structure f that adds another iconic structure to our incredible bay area landscape. it's truly a gateway to the east bay community. second this bridge it insures our safety. we all remember the distribution brought by the earthquake. we know the daggers of a future quake that's why it's so for this is built to withstand a big quake. we will right lane on this bridge to maintain the resources in the case of a man made disagrees. third this has big impacts on our economy. it will prove the transportation
different needs than people in the mission district or bayview hunters point. so often, elected officials and other hard working staff have to make tough decisions. they are political in nature, in many ways, even though people denied that, but at times, many of us are politicians, but we always try to govern with our hearts. >> i have always considered myself having progressive politics. i believe in a vision of people having their needs met. i believe in equity. when people have special needs, we should be considered of that. i also feel that working families in the lowest income population should have a safety net. we should have civil-rights and equality rights for people as well. if that is being a progressive, then i am proud of being a progressive. >> i just want to make a public statement to acknowledge that appointments to the police commission and any commission which is a policy-making body is very important. i want to encourage about keep in front of our minds the importance of not only to elect women, but to work to get more women appointed to these bodies that help make legi
and the new bridge. we're in oakland and it's fitting and a proper the first elected official is the chief of oakland. jean acquainting is one of my bosses so i'm sure her remarks will be excellent (clapping) >> and so welcome to oakland. (clapping). >> you know when i became mayor, i said oakland is a city of dreams. it's been the city of dreams since the trans conditional railroad ended and thousand of cabinets would arrive every week. it's become the city of dreams base it's the place that immigrants can afford to live and one-hundred plus languages are spoken here. in many ways this bridge was a dream of some people. and like most things in oakland it has not been easy. we have very difficult political and economic and other hurdles h that when we ail come tooth are not the results beautiful. isn't it really beautiful? so he texted the other mayor of oakland governor brown today and said we're sorry you're not here. for many of you who follow the fights he said he had an elegant view for this bridge. i know he had help from his brother they got it done and we have a bridge we can walk
their heart. i hit the campaign trail to elect a president that would make energy a national imperative. it touched me because it's the things we do at g s a everyday. just like apple products convey their products this building is no exception it has solar and open rabble windows and it represents the history in this city. we use an integrated design approach in our project and we manage our building holistically. and indeed we help the workforce because their housed. and where else is the conversion of technology and art more prevalent than here per jobs was an volley ball for workplace and i believed that successful companies thrived oneself competition rather than waiting for someone to come up with products their world leadership was for the last 15 years. g s a is leading the transformation for the frig. we were the first agency to help simplify the procurement of the board rage of services and saving million dollars discolors for the taxpayer. we're rolling out a program to help with the collaborative workspace and g s a as a great sustainable ability and it's one of the few agre
. to make a product of the discretionary act by those elected. so goes with that experiment the tentativeness of what this commitment would actually be. why is why -- which is why i would like to see what the mayor's office and board of supervisors to look at those forms of discipline and what they look like to us. >> i recognize the fear -- and i think it's a fear, not even a concern that professor simon has creating an assessment tool that can be manipulated for low-level offenses or drug offenses that can end up like the impact much like we have today with the commercial bail system. but i believe there is a way that we can create validated risk assessment tools that would look at the areas of concern. whether we are talking about the likelihood for reoffending in a violent way or the likelihood of not showing up in court. i think there are systems in place that show a tremendous amount of promise. and we can continue to go down that path to create that tool to avoid to the greatest extent possible picking on those things that frankly large people are incarcerated in the
of supervisors, who has been a staunch advocate of tenants before i was elected and with my votes on this board. my parents immigrated to the united states in the 1960's, and i was the first kid born in the u.s. my parents sacrificed everything so that their kids could have the opportunities that they wanted when they came here. i grew up in the boston area, live in different parts of boston, went to a catholic high school in dorchester, which is a section of boston. because of my parents work and the opportunities they gave me, my brothers and i were all blessed to go to harvard university. it was intense. i stayed there for college, for law school, and i also have a master's in public policy there. those are subjects i decided to study in part because i was very interested in public service and public policy issues and government. i ran for office in part because i wanted to serve the city and really protect all that is so special about what san francisco is. >> we've been talking for years about how important it is to build new neighborhoods, to develop affordable housing, make sure we have
elected officials on the state and local level who you're going to hear from in a little bit including senator leno, assemblyman phil king, our mayor. (applause) >> our recreation and park commissioners megan levitt son is here. our district 2 supervisor mark farrell. [cheering and applauding] >> our district 8 supervisor and park champion, tallest park champion in the city, scott wiener. (applause) >> our district 11 supervisor and another park champion extraordinary narc, john avalos. (applause) >> our city treasurer who does his work to make sure we've actually got the funds to pull this off, jose cisneros. (applause) ~ >> but it's the passion of all of us. and i also want to give a big shout out to the entire city family for their role, mohammed nuru and folks at department of public works had a role, lindsay hirsch. (applause) >> with all due respect to dpw and everybody else who is here, the hardest working staff in government is rec and park. gk, construction manager, mary hobson, project manager. [cheering and applauding] >> director of capital planning, don. our great operatio
people walked into my office when others elected department heads and folks that are morphs and sharks he wanted them to see who we were serving everyday. ray that's story teller and an amazing young individual and man thank you so much for everything that you do >> (clapping) >> hi, i just ask for 30 seconds or a mini want to read something. this means a lot to me. is this working? for as long as i can remember my mother instilled hard work and selfishness and most importantly culture. earlier this year for the first time in my life i moved broad and explored a new world and discovered when i am and why i am. i realized my deepest avenue missions first, i'm filipino born in raised in manila and second that i'm san franciscan. district 6 south of market sixth street. and last but not least i am an aftra and i'm going to embrace those identities. it goes without saying there are many deserving of this honor but i'm deep humid. i transmittal acknowledge those who came before me to create the foundations of which we all stand. i received this honor because i receive the messages it's not a
, boyfriend, arrived -- one time my partner, borden, said mickey should do a direct election. i said, why? the designer from the 1980's. he said, yes, but maybe it is could for perfume, things like that. to have an international passport. ok. but deep inside, i know that i should have lovo
and give back so congratulations. mayor ed lee mentioned that we had a elected representative from south dakota visiting us kevin is from the pine renal and he's the house of representatives for the 27th district with the the cha an county. kevin was 29 years old when he stepped up to the plate i will put forth my best effort. being in south dakota and coming from south dakota my heros are not always older than me. i want to introduce and give him a round of applause to continue the fight in south dakota. kevin keller house of representatives. this young man 29 years old. 29 years old. there's hope. there's hope. kevin. with you well, i want to say to you for the wonderful introduction and and that's our traditional welcoming. and it's an honoring honor to be here and thank you to the drum group for having us. i found out that about this through one of my good forensics supervisor jane kim. she's the one i met hearing her and she said yeah. shop and i didn't think i was going to be speaking. i'm 0 glad to be a part of it. this shows the strength of our country i grew up in denver so c
government is government, states are governments and cities are renetwork of elected offense like the mayors and the county but union and university all of those different sectors of our city are different portion and they can do amazing things but cities are co- governed i'd like to call a caucus. they put collaboration over conflict and it's the opposite of how washington operates. i think what can unhappy happen in the united states so all they do is quash the energy the positive patriarch energy in the country if we can see metropolitan and metropolitan area and finally their game changers and becoming for conceive and sustainable over time that patriarch will infect states and the national government. because at the end of the day we still have a representative of democracy they represent united states and we want you to act in the service of those transform active innovation. it's not going to happen tomorrow, in fact, tomorrow they may shut down the government (laughter) but it will happen over time. america is the most resistant society and the most innovative economy so folks we wil
want to recognize today, we have a number of elected officials in the room. we'll be hearing from mayor ed lee and board pointing chu and supervisor wiener sends his regrets but he tended to be here >> rituals from the office of nancy pelosi. without further ado i'd like to welcome up to the podium mayor ed lee (clapping.) happy halloween everybody. i don't want you to mistaken me for jeff curry. we're very enthusiastic about this. much of my staff are under the mistaken belief we're going to serve beer this morning. i want to congratulate everyone it's wonderful to see so many people that are part of our maker movement by people who make things in san francisco. this is i think the beginning of a huge renaissance of manufacturing in the city. i want to congratulate katie for our leadership in working with our staffs and the industries and creating partnerships and the world of merchandising and all the different companies and working with me to promote those products. i came back from china you, you know, those bags are really wonderful in china will where did you make those not in ch
. you talk about reaching policy makers and politician and elected officials, how do we reach them? you can be the best lawyer in the world, but if you don't have an investigator and you don't have the resources you are not going to be able to do a competent job. i understand that we can train individual defenders to be better defenders but how do we get those resources? >> how do we get the resources? there is not one answer to this question. i absolutely agree with karen and don that these stories move people and we have to use these stories in books and movies to get legislators who are human beings to recognize that there is a real injustice out there. i think we need to push for more funds and more resources. i think all of that is really important. the piece we bring to it is in the meantime our lawyers represent 300 people a year. the most common call i get from a lawyer, they say, i understand what my clients deserve and i can't give it to them and i think i need to quit. i i can't do what you all do. i tell them about a book i read called freedom summer about the summer projec
we focused on more what the situation calls for the 24 hour news cycles whatever the election require me to do in order though get ahead to focus on sustainability but investing in the future. so i want to thank all of you for being part of that regeneration. i want to thank all of you for your commitment to the great cause of this state so we can move past the stale debate about solvency as incredibly important as it is but focusing on greatness. that's cancels fate and that will be our future so this the significant part of it. let me close by picking up on what brian said. i saw this great documentsy about the building of santa maria are a in italy. it was built in the 15 century about 50 years before columbus set sail. it was a testament not have their proud past there was nothing - it was something new to behold. the architect at that time was renowned brunn less phillip to. he was asked over and over again about his greatness and genus by he said what malcolm was saying he said it was not my genus but the genius of underscore incidence railroad the most important people are ail
growth. elected officials have to have enormous courage to be able to raise rates, to go out for bond levies, to deal with a situation that most people don't even see. it flushed yesterday, it flushed 10 years ago, what's the problem? narrator: atlanta is a rapidly growing urban area. its primary source of drinking water is the chattahoochee river, which also provides water to many downstream communities. but its infrastructure is dangerously old, without outdated facilities and combined sewer overflows polluting the watershed. the city faces strict consent decrees and lawsuits, along with a severe lack of funding. man: when i started working for the city of atlanta in the late '70s, we were approaching that point in time where a lot was going to be needed, in terms of rehabilitation and upkeep. most of the very large pipes were at least 80 years old. we had needs that were identified in the '50s and in the '60s and in the '70s that were deferred. woman: we are urging that we all try to find a way to overcome the obstacles and limitations that might exist. woman: when i was running fo
here behind the ribbon right here. and do we have our big scissors. electeds, join me. if you are a kid, come on up. and what i will do with the kids is together we will use the big scissors. why don't you guys come on in here. all right, hold on, we're not there yet. let's not do it yet. be careful. all children with scissors, please be careful. all right. 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. yeah! ladies and gentlemen, lafayette park is officially open! >> yea! >> hello and welcome to the department and building inspection lunch program. we are talking today about earthquakes and we are going to talk about the issues that make us particularly vulnerable in san francisco and talk about the policy issues and do earthquake response and hopefully in our earthquake recovery. pat, who is a structural engineer and a guy that has looked at earthquake building upgrades in san francisco, yeah. than anybody and he has his earthquake dog harvey. >> okay. that's enough. and john paxton who is a part of caps and it's a community action plan for seismic safety and sponsored by the department of building.
for you. first of all, i'd like to bring up right away here currently, the only elected filipino official. and also the mayor's advisors of education and family services. please welcome hydro mendez. come on (clapping) thank you allen. i like that the current because there will be more. it's such a delight to be here in our home and thank you four joining us in city hall. i want to thank the neighborhood services we celebrate all our event in san francisco. i wanted to not spend a lot of time why we're here it's so obvious. the richness of our cult and history needs to be celebrated. i'm happy you're here who we are as the filipinos and the richness of our heritage we want to share throughout san francisco and california every day. this isn't just the most it's one of the many months we celebrate. tights high honor to be up here someone who is special to all of us mayor ed lee was sworn in on january 8th as our ferd mayor of the city and county and inform and the first asian american in the history. with this being the second largest population in the united states and the largest populat
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)